DSO-Brasil Guitar Duo CD Release

On Friday, April 13, the much anticipated DSO – Brasil Guitar Duo CD will be released on the Naxos Label. It is the world premiere recording of Leo Brouwer’s The Book of Signs and Paulo Bellinati’s Concert Cabolco

It will be available for download on Itunes, ArikvMusic, Amazon, and Naxos Direct. CDs will be available for purchase from the DSO.

 

Click here for DSO Music Director David Amado’s commentary on the collaboration:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh5jtHDNyFU&feature=youtu.be

 

 

DSO at Longwood Gardens

The Delaware Symphony Orchestra, led by David Amado, features dazzling violinist Jennifer Koh in an evening of Mendelssohn and Brahms. Known for her intense and commanding performances, Koh joins the Delaware Symphony Orchestra on Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64, one of the greatest violin concertos of all time and his last major orchestral work. 

 

 Jennifer Koh, violin

Recognized for her intense, commanding performances, violinist Jennifer Koh performs with dazzling virtuosity and technical assurance. She believes that all the arts and music of the past and present form a continuum and has premiered more than 60 works written especially for her. 

Koh has performed with leading orchestras worldwide. This season she performs a new concerto written for her by Christopher Cerrone and launches Limitless, which celebrates the collaborative relationship between composer and performer through duo commissions and contemporary works.

Koh also continues her many existing projects, which include solo works, recital series, and commissions for new music. Koh is the artistic director of arco collaborative, an artist-driven nonprofit that fosters a better understanding of our world through a musical dialogue inspired by ideas and the communities around us.

Koh began playing the violin by chance, but made her debut with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at age 11, and went on to win the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, the Concert Artists Guild Competition, and an Avery Fisher Career Grant. In 2016, she was named Musical America’s Instrumentalist of the Year.

David Amado, DSO Music Director and Conductor

The DSO music director since 2003, David Amado leads the DSO with musical excellence, connecting with audiences through fine musicianship and energetic performances. Dedicated to musical enrichment, Amado continues his tradition of popular pre-concert talks, and he also teaches and coaches young conductors at Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute of Music and at the Atlantic Music Festival in Maine. In addition to his Delaware post, Amado was also named Music Director of the Atlantic Classical Orchestra in Florida in April 2016. His national and international conducting appearances have brought increasing recognition to the DSO, and in Delaware he received the 2014 Governor’s Award for the Arts.

Explorer Expierience Postponed

Wilmington, Delaware – March 6, 2018.  The Delaware Symphony Orchestra announces that the Explorer Concerts for school children, scheduled to take place tomorrow, Wednesday, March 7, at The Grand Opera House in Wilmington, and Thursday, March 8, at Dover High School in Dover, have been postponed due to weather conditions predicted from this evening through Thursday morning.

DSO Executive Director Alan Jordan said, “The safety of the students, our musicians and guest performers, and others involved in these performances is first and foremost in our thinking. We will reschedule these concerts for late May of 2018.”

Chamber Series

The 2017-2018 Chamber Series has been announced, featuring 4 Tuesday evening programs!

Click View Details below to view the upcoming performances and secure your Chamber Series tickets.

Single tickets:  Call the DSO office at 302.656.7442 or purchase them online!

Contact the DSO office for more information on subscribing!

Co-Sponsored by the Hotel du Pont and DuPont Company.

 

Photo by Brian Truono

Classics Series

The 2017-2018 Classics Series has been announced, featuring 5 Friday evening programs!

Click View Details below to view the upcoming performances and secure your season subscription. Pro-rated subscriptions are still available! Contact the DSO office for details.

For single tickets: Visit tickets.thegrandwilmington.org or call 302.652.5577 to purchase your single tickets today!

Photo by Joe del Tufo

2017-2018 Family Concerts

DSO Family Concerts are back, and for three performances!

With a shorter program length, and highlights from some of your favorite pieces of music, the Family Concerts are sure to be enjoyed by all ages!

Saturday, Nov. 18 at 1:00 and 3:30, at The Tatnall School

Sunday, Nov. 19 at 3:00, at Milford High School

Click View Details below for more information.

 

Photo by Jon Ripsom

Family Concert – New Castle County

 

Our Family Concerts are designed for all ages to enjoy. They are shorter in length so that even our youngest audience members can experience live orchestral music and include something for all ages. From movie music to favorites from the classics, everyone is sure to enjoy these concerts.

The New Castle County Family Concerts will be at the Tatnall School’s Laird Performing Arts Center. Approximately one hour in length, the performances are at 1:00 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

Family Concert – Sussex County

 

Our Family Concerts are designed for all ages to enjoy. They are shorter in length so that even our youngest audience members can experience live orchestral music and include something for all ages. From movie music to favorites from the classics, everyone is sure to enjoy these concerts.

The Sussex County Family Concert will be held at Milford High School. Approximately on hour in length, the concert is at 3:00 p.m.

Classics Series Concert 1 – Sussex

 Protest and Rebellion

Not all protest is angry and violent.  Prokofiev, working against the tide of ever-larger, more complex, and dissonant musical forms, looked back to the buttoned-up decorum of the 18th Century as inspiration for his ebullient Symphony No. 1. It is a 20th Century take on Classical-era values, amped up with hyper-virtuosity and occasional flashes of bitter and ironic modern harmony and wit.

Mozart’s second trip to Paris yielded, among many things, the Concerto for Flute and Harp.  It is the only piece in which he wrote for the harp. There is no rebellion here. Rather, Mozart is the darling of the very society that Beethoven, and so many, would push back so violently in only a few decades. The concerto is of another era—refined, sometimes appealingly formulaic, and always with manners before all else. These values are precisely why Beethoven’s 5th is so explosive, subversive and bracingly new. We’ll feature our wonderful principal flutist, Kim Reighley, and our principal harpist, Sarah Fuller. How lucky we are to have such talent in our midst.

Beethoven, deeply moved by the values that fueled the American and French Revolutions, saw music not as the pursuit of the 1%, but as a powerful expression of solidarity with the masses.  We close this first concert with the 5th Symphony, with its famous opening notes, which has become the musical analog for triumph over adversity.

‑David Amado

Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra

2018 marks the 380th anniversary of the Kalmar Nyckel’s landing in America and the start of the New Sweden colony. To celebrate that historical moment, The Grand, Delaware Symphony Orchestra, and The Kalmar Nyckel Foundation will welcome the Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra from Sweden on its first North American tour. With Music Director Stefan Solyom at the helm, this revered orchestra will play a program that includes Dances from Galanta by Zoltan Kodaly, the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2, and Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9, appropriately known as “From the New World.” “The Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra plays with intensity. It must be heard.” Sinfinimusic.com   

 

Classics Series Concert 5

 

Mahler 7

Gustav Mahler, like Beethoven and Schubert, wrote 9 symphonies.  But, from a duration standpoint, with a standard set by Beethoven’s first symphony, he wrote more like 18 symphonies.  While Beethoven and Schubert wrote symphonies whose DNA connected them to Haydn and Mozart, Mahler’s symphonic DNA, though connected to Beethoven, was equally connected to the opera house.  Though his aesthetic is not rooted in the world of Verdi or even Wagner, his sense of drama, his scope of emotion, and his freedom from hard-line symphonic form make his symphonies often feel like operas without words.  They are so powerfully propelled by a sense of drama and direction that a solid hour and a third of music often ends up feeling compressed into minutes.  Mahler’s Seventh is his least played, and perhaps least understood.  The third of his middle symphonies that have no singers or chorus. The orchestra is large, but not his largest—and is most notable for the brief, but important, inclusion of mandolin and guitar.  The work, like so much Mahler, is deeply personal—and vacillates, sometimes with dramatic swings, between painful intimacy and spectacular bombast.

For program notes on the concert, click here.

Classics Series Concert 1

To subscribe, call 302.656.7442 x. 1000 and reserve your seats for the 2017-2018 Season today! 

 Protest and Rebellion

Not all protest is angry and violent.  Prokofiev, working against the tide of ever-larger, more complex, and dissonant musical forms, looked back to the buttoned-up decorum of the 18th Century as inspiration for his ebullient Symphony No. 1. It is a 20th Century take on Classical-era values, amped up with hyper-virtuosity and occasional flashes of bitter and ironic modern harmony and wit.

Mozart’s second trip to Paris yielded, among many things, the Concerto for Flute and Harp.  It is the only piece in which he wrote for the harp. There is no rebellion here. Rather, Mozart is the darling of the very society that Beethoven, and so many, would push back so violently in only a few decades. The concerto is of another era—refined, sometimes appealingly formulaic, and always with manners before all else. These values are precisely why Beethoven’s 5th is so explosive, subversive and bracingly new. We’ll feature our wonderful principal flutist, Kim Reighley, and our principal harpist, Sarah Fuller. How lucky we are to have such talent in our midst.

Beethoven, deeply moved by the values that fueled the American and French Revolutions, saw music not as the pursuit of the 1%, but as a powerful expression of solidarity with the masses.  We close this first concert with the 5th Symphony, with its famous opening notes, which has become the musical analog for triumph over adversity.

‑David Amado

Classics Series Concert 2

To subscribe, call 302.656.7442 x. 1000 and reserve your seats for the 2017-2018 Season today!

Mother Earth

Debussy: La Mer‑ With Debussy began a new kind of music.  Though composers have been influenced by the East for generations (remember Mozart’s Rondo a la Turk), for almost a century, the Orient was anything east of Vienna.  With Debussy and his contemporaries, western composers began to look past the Ottoman Empire and into the Far East.  Debussy was particularly fascinated with the Javanese Gamelan—an orchestra of percussion instruments whose repeated patterns create an undulating, textural tapestry, whose sound finds its way into much of Debussy’s music.

David Ludwig, familiar to DSO audiences, returns with his Pictures from the Floating Gardens—a work written for my Juilliard classmate, Danny Matsukawa, principal bassoonist of the small orchestra up the road (the Philadelphia Orchestra). To play the part of Danny, we are welcoming back our former principal bassoonist, Billy Short, who when not visiting Delaware, is busy as co-principal bassoon of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. 

Grofè: Grand Canyon Suite: There was, in the 1920s and 30’s an amazing confluence of musical and cultural threads that incubated some amazing hybrid music.  Think Rhapsody in Blue, Paul Whiteman’s Orchestra, or the grand symphonic nature of scores to some of the Hollywood classics of the day—like Gone with the Wind, Captian Blood, or Robin Hood.  There was a general embrace of cross-pollination.  In this atmosphere, Ferde Grofè wrote the Grand Canyon Suite.  Filled with cinematic sweep, and graphic musical tone-painting, Grofè blends a populist aesthetic with a fine ear to orchestration and dramatic unfolding.                                                                                                           

‑David Amado

Classics Series Concert 3

To subscribe, call 302.656.7442 x. 1000 and reserve your seats for the 2017-2018 Season today!

Riots

Elena Urioste comes back to Delaware to play Beethoven’s monumental Violin Concerto.  You remember Beethoven.  The angry guy who deeply wanted to believe in Fraternity, Liberty,  and Equality.  There is no better musical form than the concerto to explore those values.  A soloist in a context of a larger society‑‑ a larger culture.  The soloist interacts‑‑ sometimes in harmony, sometimes in conflict, with the environment‑‑ always looking for a way to foster and grow the relationship.  Beethoven’s only violin concerto begins with a famous timpani solo‑‑four “d”s‑‑already a rebellious conceit‑‑-starting with a drum solo‑‑but it provides the musical DNA for the whole work which is expansive‑‑at turns dramatic and lyrical.

Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, like the opening of the Beethoven Violin Concerto, places high structural and aesthetic value on percussion.  A primitivistic ballet score, the Rite was received at its premier with booing and hissing that devolved into a riot.  But it was not the music that incited violence, in spite of the score’s raw, untethered energy.  Instead, it was the dancing which seemed to violate every tenet of classical ballet.  As it happens, the score violates a lot of old, and long standing, tenets too.  Bitonality; lopsided rhythmic grooves; brazen dissonance; and wildly inventive orchestration make Rite of Spring sound fresh and shocking no matter how many times it is played.                                            

‑David Amado

Classics Series Concert 4

To subscribe, call 302.656.7442 x. 1000 and reserve your seats for the 2017-2018 Season today!

Destiny

Verdi ruled the Italian Opera Stage in the 19th c.  As such, we don’t get to indulge much at the symphony.  But when we do, it is mostly through the overtures he wrote for his operas.  We’ll begin our fourth Classics Series concert with his virtuoso overture to La Forza del Destino.  Verdi was known for his innate sense of the voice, and his ability to showcase it.  In overtures, with no voices to showcase, he equally expertly shines a light on the orchestra.  The Forza Overture is one of Verdi’s finest—great tunes, dramatic swings, bristling energy, and showstopping virtuosity.

Next is Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto. The young American Van Cliburn rose to international stardom when in 1958, with this piece as his vehicle, he became the first American to win the Tchaikovsky Competition in the chill of the Cold War.  The Soviets surely were expecting to demonstrate their cultural superiority to the west—but Cliburn eclipsed the other contestants, and won over the jury.  The rest is history.  In the role of Cliburn, we welcome Orien Weiss—a brilliant musician of our era. The concerto is brimming with beloved tunes and pianistic pyrotechnics.  And of course, Tchaikovsky was, together with Gershwin, Cole Porter, and Schubert, one of the finest melodists to walk the planet.  And he gives us some of his finest here.

We close with Bartok’s Concerto for Orchestra.  Where Tchaikovsky—and Beethoven—wrote concertos featuring a soloist (or in the case of Mozart, two soloists), Bartok changed the rules of engagement, and wrote a concerto for everyone.  It is the ultimate in egalitarianism.  The whole orchestra is the soloist.  Different sections, and individuals take their turn showing off.  Bartok was one of the first ethnomusicologists—he roamed around his native Hungary with a wax cylinder recorder documenting locals’ folksongs.  Many of those songs find their way into his work—but more importantly, the musical language of those songs becomes Bartok’s own—imbuing his work with a genuine flavor of Hungary. 

‑David Amado